Wednesday, 8 January 2014

Reconnect with nature - one photograph at a time

{reconnecting with nature}

A community of like minded people who see the value in understanding and appreciating the natural world.  Each week we step outside, find some nature, photograph it and learn something about it to share with others.  Just a few sentences about the tree you’ve photographed, or the bird you've seen, or how you’re noticing the seasons changing is all you need and together we'll reconnect with nature, one photograph at time.
 
 
Read more about the Reconnect with Nature - one photograph at a time idea here
 

 


Catching Ghost Crabs (Ocypode ceratophthalma) at Wooli, NSW Australia
New Years Eve we participated in a local tradition whilst staying at the beach. After the sun went down, we took a torch and bucket and went looking for ghost crabs. Ghost Crabs are a small crab, only about 6-8cm across the carapace that live in burrows in the sand dunes.  At night they come down to feed on the flotsam (love that word) deposited on the beach by the previous high tide.   
They move really quick on the sand, l read up to 2.1 meters per second so you have to move really quickly to catch them.  We had such fun, and laughed so hard watching each other scrambling over the sand to catch them.  It was great to be able to show the girls the crabs up close and we even found some females that were carrying eggs. 
Disclaimer - no crabs were harmed in the making of this post :) all were released back again in the sand dunes and the females carrying eggs were gently returned straight away.


8 comments:

  1. Ghost Crabs - very interesting. I do like the word flotsam, it rolls quite nicely. Were the eggs on the female easily spotted? Carrying on her back? I have been recently reading about sea turtles, Loggerheads in particular.

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    1. Thanks for popping in Mary Lou. :)
      The female crab carrys her eggs on her underside, under a tail like flap on their abdomen. I think most crustaceans carry their eggs that way? We even saw a female release her eggs into the waves when we let her go. Just amazing.
      The girls were very worried about the Mummy crabs and their babies. :) Us girls have to stick together you know !

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  2. What a great way for the kids to learn about the local wildlife, (ocean life), as well as the local tradition. Looks like good fun!

    PS...Love the photo link you added....very nice!

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    1. Big thanks for joining in Julie !
      Love the ground cherry you found in the desert. How wonderful is it to share our finds and adventures from opposite sides of the world. :)

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  3. Wonderful photos and how we can find joy and warmth in nature. Sending my photo via email :-)

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    1. Always love it when my Aunt from Canada drops in and says hello :)
      I'm sure there are lots of native animals in North America looking for a bit of warmth at the moment!

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  4. Cool post Chrisy! Too cold for crabs around here!

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    1. Thanks Katie, awesome to have you participate in the link up.
      I really love your post, very brave to go out in the that weather to find some nature, thank you !!

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